Sexually transmitted infection statistics around the globe

Causes Of STDS

What Are Sexually transmitted infections And How Common Are They In Australia

As kids grow older it is important to educate them about sex and sexually transmitted infections. Using the proper protective measures can help reduce a person’s likelihood of getting a sexually transmitted infection. There are a lot of diseases to worry about when it comes to sex and some of them are not always noticeable. While some symptoms of sexually transmitted infections include visual indicators such as red bumps, rashes, redness or swelling, it is not always obvious and a person may engage in sexual activity with an infected person without knowing it. Educating I was young and old with the latest information surrounding sexual health is of the utmost importance.

By educating young people, it can reduce the number of people who become infected by sexually transmitted infections when they get older which can reduce economic strain on the society. When people do you get a sexually transmitted infection at can hinder their work performance, take sick time, require expensive medical treatment, take up medical resources, and have a heavy impact on the health system.

Transmission Of STD

What impacts whether you get an STI

All of these things can negatively impact a person’s life but also the economy and this in turn has an effect on the price of goods and services. So teaching good sexual health at a young age can help save everyone time, money, and resources on top of having better overall sexual health. One notable statistic surrounding sexually transmitted infections is that children ages 15 up to 24 makeup for half of all new infections. So what are some examples of sexually transmitted infections? some of the most common sexually transmitted infections include bacterial vaginosis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, genital herpes, hepatitis, HIV / AIDS, human papillomavirus (HPV),  pelvic inflammatory disease (PID),  syphilis, and trichomoniasis.

Getting a diagnosis of any of these infections is not a death sentence, but if left untreated they can develop into life-threatening issues. Infections that are left untreated have the potential to develop into sepsis which can be deadly.

Education is key

Educating children it’s not the only way you can fight sexually transmitted infections from spreading. Public initiatives involving handing out condoms, we were kids, and other Sexual Health Wellness items have been shown to have a positive impact on a society’s sexual health, especially among lower-income families. Some statistics regarding these infections include hey 63% increase in gonorrhea cases since 2014, a 19% increase in chlamydia cases since 2014, and 185% increase in congenital syphilis since 2014. These are all startling figures which show how these infections can spread especially among young people. Practicing good hygiene as well as abstaining from sex with people who have not been tested is the only sure way to avoid catching these sexually transmitted infections. However, it is not realistic for children to all be tested and to carry their test results everywhere they go.

Is there a substitute for testing

As a substitute for testing and test results, one can practice good sexual health measures such as wearing a condom. While wearing a condom does not guarantee you will not receive a sexually transmitted infection from your partner, it does reduce the likelihood. The best approach is to limit your sexual activity to one person who you are certain does not have a sexually transmitted infection. While it is impossible to know whether someone is lying, getting to know someone and observing their overall health can be one indicator of whether they have a sexually transmitted infection. 

Don’t skip appointments

It is up to people to use their judgment and make sensible choices with their sex life. If you suspect you may have come in contact with the first and who has a sexually transmitted infection you should see your doctor immediately. You should also abstain from any further sexual contact with anyone until you have been tested and cleared by your doctor. Otherwise the infection may spread and you may be spreading it unknowingly. Keeping an eye out for the telltale signs such as redness, rashes, and swelling can help you identify whether your partner has a sexually transmitted infection or whether you may have one yourself. See your doctor for regular check-ups and inform them of any symptoms you are experiencing to identify a sexually transmitted infection early.

Mark Reed

Physician at Arizona hospital
Dr. Mark Reed, MD had always loved friends Arizona with its pretty, precious people. It was a place where he felt proud to be a member of the community. He was a compassionate, healthy, athlete with thin arms and long legs in high school. His friends saw him as an enthusiastic, delightful student. Once, he had even helped a sneezing old woman cross the road near the market. That's the sort of man he is. After graduating from medical school, Dr. Mark walked over to the window and reflected on people and his surroundings. The sun shone on his career and he embraced his new life of helping others. After a talk as a guest speaker at Stanford one year, he saw something in the distance, or rather someone. It was the figure just like a young version of Dr. Mark Reed. This was a caring student with tired arms and a frail hand. Dr. Mark saw it as an opportunity to reach out and become a mentor. He was not prepared to see a version of himself during his speaking appearance at a local college. As Dr. Mark stepped outside and the young med student came closer, he could see the wet glint in his eye. Dr. Mark gazed with the affection of a father. He offered to help him when it came time to do his internship. That is the kind of caring person Dr. Mark has become known as. Dr. Mark always does kind things for patients such as warming the stethoscope. The people Dr. Mark has helped at the Arizona hospital where his work has made him a pillar of the community. Dr. Mark regards his patients' tired limbs with care and always has a way of making them feel comfortable. After graduating from Arizona State University Dr. Mark went on to Harvard before taking a residency at Johns Hopkins University. After several years, he eventually announced he had been accepted at a prestigious Arizona Hospital. Dr. Mark focuses on being ethical, his emotions are always in check, and he is determined to serve his patients to the best of his ability.
Mark Reed

Author: Mark Reed

Dr. Mark Reed, MD had always loved friends Arizona with its pretty, precious people. It was a place where he felt proud to be a member of the community. He was a compassionate, healthy, athlete with thin arms and long legs in high school. His friends saw him as an enthusiastic, delightful student. Once, he had even helped a sneezing old woman cross the road near the market. That's the sort of man he is. After graduating from medical school, Dr. Mark walked over to the window and reflected on people and his surroundings. The sun shone on his career and he embraced his new life of helping others. After a talk as a guest speaker at Stanford one year, he saw something in the distance, or rather someone. It was the figure just like a young version of Dr. Mark Reed. This was a caring student with tired arms and a frail hand. Dr. Mark saw it as an opportunity to reach out and become a mentor. He was not prepared to see a version of himself during his speaking appearance at a local college. As Dr. Mark stepped outside and the young med student came closer, he could see the wet glint in his eye. Dr. Mark gazed with the affection of a father. He offered to help him when it came time to do his internship. That is the kind of caring person Dr. Mark has become known as. Dr. Mark always does kind things for patients such as warming the stethoscope. The people Dr. Mark has helped at the Arizona hospital where his work has made him a pillar of the community. Dr. Mark regards his patients' tired limbs with care and always has a way of making them feel comfortable. After graduating from Arizona State University Dr. Mark went on to Harvard before taking a residency at Johns Hopkins University. After several years, he eventually announced he had been accepted at a prestigious Arizona Hospital. Dr. Mark focuses on being ethical, his emotions are always in check, and he is determined to serve his patients to the best of his ability.

7 thoughts on “Sexually transmitted infection statistics around the globe”

  1. Five months ago my brother had a sexual encounter with another man wo was the active participant in the encounter. A condom was not used during the sexual encounter and my brother allowed the guy to cum inside his rectum. Approximately 7 days later after the encounter the active participant contacted my brother to inform him that he had contracted Chlamydia and he should get tested to determine if he was infected. My brother immediately drove to the ER and explained to the ER Doctor the circumstances and the ER Doctor treated him with a one day course of antibiotics. Although the ER Doctor did not conduct a test to determine if he contracted Chlamydia, he felt it was in his best interest to treat him as if he did contract Chlamydia. He did have and STD test done 2 months after the encounter and was negative for Chlamydia.

  2. Most people are ashamed to consult a doctor when they feel they have sexually transmitted infections. That’s what happened to me, my boyfriend exposed me to it and I had to get some treatment for the pain an I swore never to get back with him.

  3. I got an STI from my ex girlfriend, who clearly had slept around in college or something. I ended up with gonorrhea. Sexual promiscuity leads to all sorts of problems, and it’s not fair that I had to get one because I dated someone who got around too much.

  4. Wear your condoms, men! Don’t be like me and get the clap from a woman who says she didn’t sleep around. She lied! My burning penis and drip was the proof positive. Thankfully, I ditched her and got some antibiotics and was over it in a week. It could have been much worse and been HIV, so I am thankful every day that it wasn’t.

  5. At 17 he had a very active sex life. I remember that on one occasion I had a bad smell, burning when urinating and secretion through the penis. So I went to the doctor, who asked me about having had unprotected sex and after analyzing me I was diagnosed with chlamydia, so he gave me treatment and told me to contact the person who had possibly contacted me so she could also try .

  6. I contracted Syphlis from a girlfriend a few years back and it was a shaming experience. She did not realize that she had it and I had to tell her after I was diagnosed. Even though she is the one that gave it to me it was still a humbling experience to let her know that she has a sexually transmitted disease and she had given it to me

  7. I had a threesome with a guy and girl. I did it only because I liked and knew the girl well. I was unfamiliar with the guy, and didn’t really want to do anything. The guy kind of just inserted himself into me without my knowing it was about to happen. I ended up two minor infections after, I knew it was from the guy. I took antibiotics.

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