Do Australians Suffer From STDs

Australia is in no exception when it comes to having issue with STDs. Although its rate is lower than most countries there are still a ways to go solving the issue of STDs, but perhaps there is another way to look at STDs a way in which we can understand how STDs have shaped society and the role they play in even shaping Australia’s society. STDs have been around before the beginning of human existence. Syphilis, herpes, UTIs have been in existence for far longer than we can remember before we even knew about bacteria and microscopic germs. If anything one could argue that STDs gave the incentive for us to advance our civilization. They create a world that is difficult for us sexual creatures to thrive in, one in which drives us to improve our medicine and the way we view the world in such a way to solve these issues. Before the advent and understanding of science which was the harbinger for modern medicine to treat STDs people developed morals.

Types Of STDs

How culture affects STDs

Morality is highly influenced by diseases, STDs in particular. We, as a human society, often and quite wrongly shun those with different sexual orientations than us for their sexual promiscuity. Societies generally shun the female sexuality or same sex partnerships and it is wrong, but how did we arrive at this stage? Even men struggle with STDs. The prevalence of STDs that we as humans faced before our understanding of germs and medicine created a fear of promiscuity; it made humanity into primarily a species which extolled the virtue of monogamy; which means one male, one female/male relationship. Many societies see monogamy as a positive thing, people often dream about their soulmates and their desire to find that one special person that they’re in love with. This is a predilection that aroused out of nature and our desire to reduce the rate and chance of STDs.

Relationships

This preference of monogamous relationships is something that one can argue built society, it gave our species strong preference for long-term planning in relationships in order to avoid the spread of diseases and one that ultimately lead to increase of wealth and resources. Traditions which promoted monogamy such as marriage or girlfriend/boyfriend relationships improved our society and halted to spread of diseases to an extent. The fear of STDs also motivated people to find drugs to treat them and advanced medicine as there is a high demand on Valtrex medicine to treat STDs. Countries such as Australia where monogamy is highly prevalent in society STD rates are considerably lower and society is more stable.

Lower rates in Australia

Australia and other developed nations where there are strong traditions around monogamy have demonstrably lower STDs rates than those which lack traditions. We can also correlate the decline of traditions such as marriage and other social constructs with the rise in STDs. I’m not saying it’s wrong not to get marriage, only that there is a correlation. Of course there may be unfortunate outliers where a monogamous couple my somehow come into contact with STDs, but we find with various research and studies that most often the rate of STD infections obvious decline with less sexual partners.

Economic effects

Furthermore, we can also see, in comparison, that highly promiscuous societies that STD infection is much more common. Now whether this is related to the fact that underdeveloped countries have less access to medicine and advanced practice techniques or that the culling of tradition has led to more promiscuous activity and thus less economic develop remains unforeseen. It’s the chicken and the egg argument.

Which came first?

Although, we’re not certain we can probably assume that there is a bit of truth to both arguments.

There is also evidence that points to tribes which have not been assimilated or disturbed much by outside forces have lower rates of STD. There may also be less STDs in tribal societies in which there are strong monogamous traditions.

Human ingenuity

So, what is this all building up to here? I suppose this is just a unique way of looking at a problem that has been difficult for human history. We as humans enjoy sex, but unfortunately it can sometimes come at a cost. Hundreds and thousands of Australians are suffering from STDs daily and it’s something hopefully in the future that we will be able to solve.

Maybe the clues to solving these issues may lay in the past of human history and perhaps the traditions that were spurred on by monogamy such as chastity for females and marriage will reduce STDs and help society grow or maybe someday hopefully medicine will advance to the point where STDs are easily treatable. A day when humans can enjoy having sex and avoid the baggage or risks that come with it for the betterment of not only Australian, but humankind.

 

Mark Reed

Physician at Arizona hospital
Dr. Mark Reed, MD had always loved friends Arizona with its pretty, precious people. It was a place where he felt proud to be a member of the community. He was a compassionate, healthy, athlete with thin arms and long legs in high school. His friends saw him as an enthusiastic, delightful student. Once, he had even helped a sneezing old woman cross the road near the market. That's the sort of man he is. After graduating from medical school, Dr. Mark walked over to the window and reflected on people and his surroundings. The sun shone on his career and he embraced his new life of helping others. After a talk as a guest speaker at Stanford one year, he saw something in the distance, or rather someone. It was the figure just like a young version of Dr. Mark Reed. This was a caring student with tired arms and a frail hand. Dr. Mark saw it as an opportunity to reach out and become a mentor. He was not prepared to see a version of himself during his speaking appearance at a local college. As Dr. Mark stepped outside and the young med student came closer, he could see the wet glint in his eye. Dr. Mark gazed with the affection of a father. He offered to help him when it came time to do his internship. That is the kind of caring person Dr. Mark has become known as. Dr. Mark always does kind things for patients such as warming the stethoscope. The people Dr. Mark has helped at the Arizona hospital where his work has made him a pillar of the community. Dr. Mark regards his patients' tired limbs with care and always has a way of making them feel comfortable. After graduating from Arizona State University Dr. Mark went on to Harvard before taking a residency at Johns Hopkins University. After several years, he eventually announced he had been accepted at a prestigious Arizona Hospital. Dr. Mark focuses on being ethical, his emotions are always in check, and he is determined to serve his patients to the best of his ability.
Mark Reed

Author: Mark Reed

Dr. Mark Reed, MD had always loved friends Arizona with its pretty, precious people. It was a place where he felt proud to be a member of the community. He was a compassionate, healthy, athlete with thin arms and long legs in high school. His friends saw him as an enthusiastic, delightful student. Once, he had even helped a sneezing old woman cross the road near the market. That's the sort of man he is. After graduating from medical school, Dr. Mark walked over to the window and reflected on people and his surroundings. The sun shone on his career and he embraced his new life of helping others. After a talk as a guest speaker at Stanford one year, he saw something in the distance, or rather someone. It was the figure just like a young version of Dr. Mark Reed. This was a caring student with tired arms and a frail hand. Dr. Mark saw it as an opportunity to reach out and become a mentor. He was not prepared to see a version of himself during his speaking appearance at a local college. As Dr. Mark stepped outside and the young med student came closer, he could see the wet glint in his eye. Dr. Mark gazed with the affection of a father. He offered to help him when it came time to do his internship. That is the kind of caring person Dr. Mark has become known as. Dr. Mark always does kind things for patients such as warming the stethoscope. The people Dr. Mark has helped at the Arizona hospital where his work has made him a pillar of the community. Dr. Mark regards his patients' tired limbs with care and always has a way of making them feel comfortable. After graduating from Arizona State University Dr. Mark went on to Harvard before taking a residency at Johns Hopkins University. After several years, he eventually announced he had been accepted at a prestigious Arizona Hospital. Dr. Mark focuses on being ethical, his emotions are always in check, and he is determined to serve his patients to the best of his ability.

15 thoughts on “Do Australians Suffer From STDs”

  1. I got syphilis from my ex-boyfriend a couple of months ago. Despite having an open relationship I knew it was him because he finally confessed to me that he had been diagnosed. I’m taking medication now, I’m glad they caught it early.

  2. I got Herpes from my girlfriend, the only person I had ever slept with. She never showed any symptoms, was on the pill, and seemed completely safe, so when my symptoms showed up, it never occurred to me that I had an STD. I thought it was just flu or something. I went to my doctor and actually laughed when he said it might be Herpes. When the test came back positive, I couldn’t believe it. Since then, I learned that many people have Herpes and that some individuals who are positive never show any symptoms. I’m always careful to use condoms now and tell partners that I have the virus.

  3. I caught an STI (syphilis) from a one night stand. It was so embarrassing, but I sucked it up and got treatment and informed my ONS partner. It wasn’t that big of a deal in the long run, and I am glad I got it taken care of.

  4. One of my best friend from school told me that he was a player. He used to date several women at once. He was told several times to slow down, but he just laugh and continue to do the same. One day he told me that he met this woman and she seems to be right for him, but he told me that in return he end up with the clap and wasn’t such where he got it from.

  5. “I get tested every year,” he said. I learned that there is no test for human papillomavirus (HPV) in men the hard way – when I got a call after my annual gynecologist appointment that I had a positive HPV test. Now I know that there is no cure except time, condoms don’t stop the spread, almost all sexually active adults have it at some point, and most never know.

  6. I never thought a married person could get and STD like gonorrhea. But my wife was out messing around with other guys and didn’t use protection. Sooner or later the truth will catch you.

  7. Recently, i was diagnosed with chlamydia. I have been really promiscuous lately and forgot a few times to wear a condom my last sexual experience. Boy did i regret this. The itching sensation is the worst and it feels like it burns when i pee. Thank god i can just use an antibiotic and it goes away or else id be screwed.

  8. One of my friends acquired a urinary tract infection from what I believe was chlamydia. He told me one morning his urine burned and was white (it was puss) and he got it from a person who was temporarily staying with us.

  9. After I hooked up with this guy I met on tinder, he texted me and told me he was seeing red dots on his penis. I was afraid that I had given him an STD. He was afraid too! However, we both got tested and it turned out that he just had a yeast infection. And I was clean.

  10. I work in an Emergency Department and people come in for sexually transmitted infections/diseases checks all the time. We are located near a military base and many young men will come in to be seen and evaluated for possible sexually transmitted infections/diseases exposure MOMENTS after having unprotected intercourse with someone they just met. Sometimes they will come in PACKS! Multiple men will come in after a night outon the town and ask to be checked out. We try to educate these young men on the importance of having protected sex. We also try to educate them on the inappropriateness of abusing the Emergency Department for non emergent needs. Sadly, many of them laugh it off and take the prophylactics and go back out next weekend. Many we see repeatedly while they are based in our area. So as they say… Boys will be boys I guess.

  11. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are infections you can get by having sex with someone who has an infection.STIs caused by viruses include hepatitis B, herpes, HIV, and the human papilloma virus (HPV). STIs caused by bacteria include chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis.Your Guide to Sexually Transmitted Infections. General information on STIs and genital conditions.
    Chlamydia. Chlamydia is a common bacterial STI that affects men and women.

  12. One time i had blood in my sperm called Hemastopermia after a series of unprotected sex with one particular partner, i went to carry out a medical check to determine the cause. I was tested for chlamydia, herpes and Hiv. The result for Hiv and herpes came out negative but chlamydia came out positive. treatment commenced immediately and it includes the dosage of antibiotics such as azithromycin and doxycycline which must be taken twice per day for one week.

  13. I got a yeast infection from a partner. Usually men are less likely to have yeast infection symptoms, which is why my partner showed no signs of having it. I thought we were monogamous, but apparently not, as he contracted it from another woman. I was angry and hurt.

  14. Oh boy, where do I start? College was a crazy time! No condoms for this guy! I had unprotected sex with about a dozen girls in college. I would say after having a fun time with number 9, I noticed my semen was quite yellow looking one day after masturbating. Also, it felt like I had to urinate all the time for about two days straight. I never went to the doctor, I let it run its course. I think it was The Clap. No biggie. All is well now. Married and living the good life.

  15. Sexually transmitted infections are infections you can get by having sex with someone who has an infection. These infections are usually passed from person to person through vaginal intercourse. They can also be passed through anal sex, oral sex, or skin-to-skin contact. An STD can be indicated by pain or a burning sensation during urination, the need to pee more frequently, or the presence of blood in the urine.

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