Irritable Bowel Syndrome: tips for managing symptoms and finding out the best diet for your gut

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract mainly characterized by abdominal pain and alterations of the alvo (problems in defecation) in the absence of any other specific pathology that causes its symptoms.   Epidemiology Although the prevalence of the disease is generally difficult to understand due to the heterogeneity of the diagnostic criteria, community studies tell us that this syndrome involves 10 to 25% of the population, differently depending on the country.
IBS is spread 1.5 to 3 times more in women and affects 50% of people under the age of 35.

The causes of IBS have not yet been clearly identified.

However it is known that among the factors potentially implicated in its genesis we can find a previous gastrointestinal infection (which causes persistent immunological alterations, ie of the immune system, and muscular and neuronal hyperreactivity of the intestinal wall), an alteration of brain neurohormonal mechanisms, a altered permeability of the intestinal mucosa and possible food intolerances.

The main physiological mechanisms underlying this functional disorder are related to the alteration of intestinal motility, to the individual’s hypersensitivity to visceral pain (pain originating from the internal organs of our body), to psychological disorders (anxiety, depression ), to the irritation of the intestinal mucosa or of the bacterial population that naturally inhabits our intestine (microbiome).

The management consists mainly in the adoption of dietary measures, of a possible psychological support aimed at improving the management of stress and, finally, of the use of symptomatic drugs.

 

Dietary measures

Avoiding caffeine, alcohol and exciting drinks can help reduce anxiety and irritability of the intestinal mucosa.

Avoiding legumes, as well as lactose and fructose in patients who are already intolerant, can prevent the increase in abdominal bloating.

In some cases, the irritable bowel syndrome may also be associated with gluten intolerance even in the absence of overt celiac disease; a diet without or with a reduced amount of gluten can help improve symptoms.

Furthermore, a particular group of particularly fermentable carbohydrates (FODMAPs) present in fruits and vegetables as well as in flours and in many other foods of our diet, in particular conditions can lead to an increased bacterial proliferation which increases gas production and therefore swelling . Not being able to eliminate them completely, temporary diets can be chosen aimed at containing the ingestion of these substances.

Pharmacological treatment is mainly symptomatic and involves, in the treatment of abdominal swelling and pain, the use of antispasmodic and antidepressant drugs, while the use of fibers is not always able to reduce symptoms.

In the diarrheal form of IBS, antidiarrheal drugs reduce the frequency and increase the consistency of the stools while they have no effects on pain or abdominal distension.

From 2012 it is suggested the use of Linaclotide, an agonist of guanilate cyclase 2C (an enzyme with an important role in the secretion of fluids by intestinal mucosa cells) for the treatment of chronic constipation in IBS with predominant constipation.

Rifaximin, a locally acting antibiotic, is used in the diarrheal forms of IBS and has action on symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal bloating and pain.

 

Mark Reed

Physician at Arizona hospital
Dr. Mark Reed, MD had always loved friends Arizona with its pretty, precious people. It was a place where he felt proud to be a member of the community. He was a compassionate, healthy, athlete with thin arms and long legs in high school. His friends saw him as an enthusiastic, delightful student. Once, he had even helped a sneezing old woman cross the road near the market. That's the sort of man he is. After graduating from medical school, Dr. Mark walked over to the window and reflected on people and his surroundings. The sun shone on his career and he embraced his new life of helping others. After a talk as a guest speaker at Stanford one year, he saw something in the distance, or rather someone. It was the figure just like a young version of Dr. Mark Reed. This was a caring student with tired arms and a frail hand. Dr. Mark saw it as an opportunity to reach out and become a mentor. He was not prepared to see a version of himself during his speaking appearance at a local college. As Dr. Mark stepped outside and the young med student came closer, he could see the wet glint in his eye. Dr. Mark gazed with the affection of a father. He offered to help him when it came time to do his internship. That is the kind of caring person Dr. Mark has become known as. Dr. Mark always does kind things for patients such as warming the stethoscope. The people Dr. Mark has helped at the Arizona hospital where his work has made him a pillar of the community. Dr. Mark regards his patients' tired limbs with care and always has a way of making them feel comfortable. After graduating from Arizona State University Dr. Mark went on to Harvard before taking a residency at Johns Hopkins University. After several years, he eventually announced he had been accepted at a prestigious Arizona Hospital. Dr. Mark focuses on being ethical, his emotions are always in check, and he is determined to serve his patients to the best of his ability.
Mark Reed

Author: Mark Reed

Dr. Mark Reed, MD had always loved friends Arizona with its pretty, precious people. It was a place where he felt proud to be a member of the community. He was a compassionate, healthy, athlete with thin arms and long legs in high school. His friends saw him as an enthusiastic, delightful student. Once, he had even helped a sneezing old woman cross the road near the market. That's the sort of man he is. After graduating from medical school, Dr. Mark walked over to the window and reflected on people and his surroundings. The sun shone on his career and he embraced his new life of helping others. After a talk as a guest speaker at Stanford one year, he saw something in the distance, or rather someone. It was the figure just like a young version of Dr. Mark Reed. This was a caring student with tired arms and a frail hand. Dr. Mark saw it as an opportunity to reach out and become a mentor. He was not prepared to see a version of himself during his speaking appearance at a local college. As Dr. Mark stepped outside and the young med student came closer, he could see the wet glint in his eye. Dr. Mark gazed with the affection of a father. He offered to help him when it came time to do his internship. That is the kind of caring person Dr. Mark has become known as. Dr. Mark always does kind things for patients such as warming the stethoscope. The people Dr. Mark has helped at the Arizona hospital where his work has made him a pillar of the community. Dr. Mark regards his patients' tired limbs with care and always has a way of making them feel comfortable. After graduating from Arizona State University Dr. Mark went on to Harvard before taking a residency at Johns Hopkins University. After several years, he eventually announced he had been accepted at a prestigious Arizona Hospital. Dr. Mark focuses on being ethical, his emotions are always in check, and he is determined to serve his patients to the best of his ability.

11 thoughts on “Irritable Bowel Syndrome: tips for managing symptoms and finding out the best diet for your gut”

  1. Huh!? What there is nothing listed above for the about part of this question. I am writing about what? This is deeply confusing but, I shall write about the word about. It is about time someone recognized about’s greatness. To those it may concern about is a 5 letter word. In the event this study is about the period at the end of the sentence i find the period is the most useful piece of punctuation ending a sentence. I would quote google on all this but, I do not remember how to do that without it being copy write, so this is the best possible random response you got. Why are the samples blank? What do I need information about your test deeply confuses me.

  2. Since there was nothing suggested for me to write about, I will write about how the lack of a subject effects this survey. I believe that without a given topic, as indicated in the preview of this survey, it increases the challenge level of this task. The reward of $0.15 is not enough given the difficulty level. Perhaps if a topic was given, that would be a reasonable amount. I hope this helps!

  3. Enjoying a person not only comes from the sexual or erotic act, goes beyond the soul, emotions and feelings of that individual, is to combine in a magical and harmonious way with the environment and soul of the other person

  4. It’s difficult to complete this text when you didn’t give a subject to write about. I find this time consuming and wasteful. But, I am writing my opinion in the hope that I will get paid. Maybe you need to review your instructions. It’s so frustrating to try to accomplish these tasks when the information isn’t there or is incomplete. This seems utterly ridiculous to me but maybe you have your reasons. Whatever,, good luck.

  5. A period is used in the English language to represent the conclusion of a sentence. This little black dot can separate thoughts by simply being placed behind a set of words. Before ending your sentence with a period, a noun, verb, or adjective should be placed along with a subject to complete the sentence prior to the period being placed. When reading a sentence in its entirety one should stop and take a pause when getting to the period in the sentence, thus signifying the breakage between two sentences. One should not use a period to ask a questions or show excitement in the text because there are other punctuation symbols to represent these for sentences that require a question or excitement. As you can see, a period is an important punctuational piece in the English language to symbolize the completion of a thought or comment. A period should be used regularly in ones written text of stories, thoughts and comments.
    (There was/is not an apparent word that was placed in the unique text area in the above directions other then a period)

  6. Having IBS sucks sometimes, but I try to keep a positive outlook. The stomach issues and constant need to be near a bathroom sometimes has defintiely changed my life, but its also showed me how lucky I am in many ways. I have a wife who loves and supports me, as well as kids who still look at me like I’m their hero. While its easy to get upset about my illness, I know it has made me a better person.

  7. I’m 24 and was diagnosed with IBS in my mid-teens, after several years of accidents through school. I was feeling so frustrated & alone and kids would call me Mr. Schitz. Finally got help.

  8. I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome in my early 20s which was a huge detriment to my social standing. No longer did I feel as comfortable going out to dinner with friends as I would get anxiety about what I could or could not eat and how it would affect me later on.

  9. Having to live with a constant abdominal pain caused by gases is not easy, I have had to endure and treat this problem that causes me to suffer from irritable bowel, even though it has taught me to eat healthy with passivity, I was one of those people who I liked to eat fast to save time and in addition to eating fast, I ate anything that crossed me, junk food more than anything, but the only good thing that has given me to suffer from this is to learn to eat well for my own health.

  10. I was diagnosed with IBS with constipation my senior year of high school. Ever since then, dealing with it has been very difficult. The constant bloating and stomach pain has really reduced the quality of my life. I’ve been seeing a doctor, but finding a treatment that works for me has been difficult. Still, I have hope – I know I can get through this!

  11. I never had any digestive problems until I got pregnant with my first son. That seems to have changed everything down there. Now I can’t drink coffee and have to make sure I’m always within a two-minute dash to the bathroom.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *